Boston Agreement

Boston Agreement

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This boycott lasted until 1770, when the British Parliament was forced to repeal the laws against which the Boston Non-Import Agreement was intended. Non-import agreements have not only contributed to the upsurriving of undesirable behaviour, but have also contributed to lower exchange rates and the clearing of inventories filled with importers. In addition to the English, American settlers were also an audience for the Boston Agreement. On the one hand, there were traders, traders, craftsmen and traders who would benefit from the economic benefits of a successful boycott. On the other hand, in the political spheres, it could serve as an example of triumphant opposition to the British. To achieve such a victory, it was crucial that the boycott was accompanied by as many traders and traders as possible, not only in Boston, but in all the colonies of the New World. This agreement was addressed directly to the British Parliament. Nevertheless, Parliament was not alone in being effective. On the contrary, Boston businessmen hoped that their English colleagues would put pressure on Parliament to prevent colonial trade from being damaged or worse, which would affect the economy and well-being of the United Kingdom. As early as 1766, the practice of non-import agreements against the importation and trade with Great Britain of the cities of the American colonies was adopted. The sons of freedom were proponents of the application of non-import agreements and other similar boycott tactics. The Stamp Act was repealed because of joint non-import agreements by U.S. colonies.

New York merchants first implemented the non-import agreement to protest the Stamp Act, and they managed to convince merchants in other cities to do the same. Boston was one of the new York merchant cities that were convinced to participate in the non-import agreement to fight the Stamp Act. Following the successful boycott and pressure from British traders who lost money, Britain gave in and eventually cancelled the Stamp Act. Other U.S. cities have implemented similar non-import agreements to oppose the unpopular British policy. The use of raw materials, goods produced in the colonies and Yankee ingenuity were commonplace. Meanwhile, the American colonies experimented with the idea of being self-sufficient and not relying on the metropolis. This experience would be invaluable, because in a few years during the revolution, the British Royal Navy would blockade the American coast and close many major port cities. In the non-import agreement in Boston, traders and traders agreed to boycott goods under the Townshend Revenue Act until taxes on those goods were lifted.