Epa London Agreement

Epa London Agreement

Epa London Agreement 150 150 protek

The agreement did not change other language provisions applicable prior to the issuance of a European patent, such as the requirement to translate claims for a European patent application “in the two official languages of the European Patent Office, with a different language of procedure,” after receiving notification of Rule 71 (3) CBE indicating that the EPO intends to issue a European patent. On 16 December 2007, an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) was concluded between Cariforum (Caricom and the Dominican Republic) and the European Community (EC). This is the culmination of three years of formal negotiations between the parties. The 1972 Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution through the Introduction of Waste and Other Substances, commonly known as the “London Convention” or “LC `72”, which is also considered marine dumping, is an agreement to combat marine pollution through dumping and to promote regional agreements that complement the agreement. It includes the voluntary disposal of waste or other substances from ships, aircraft and offshore platforms. It does not apply to discharges from land sources such as pipelines and falls, waste produced in the normal operation of ships, or the placement of materials for purposes other than simple disposal, provided that such disposal is not contrary to the objectives of the convention. It came into force in 1975. As of September 2016, there were 89 parties to the agreement. [1] [2] This agreement was signed by ten countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. To enter into force, ratification instruments had to be tabled by at least eight countries, including at least France, Germany and the United Kingdom.

So far, Monaco, Germany, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Denmark and France have tabled their ratification instruments on the London Agreement, while Slovenia, Iceland, Latvia and Croatia have tabled their accession instruments (accession will also be taken into account when the agreement enters into force). Sweden was ratified on 29 April 2008. [28] The agreement on the application of Article 65 CBE – the London Agreement – is an optional agreement to reduce the cost of translating European patents. It is the result of long-standing efforts to establish a cost-effective post-issue translation system, which began in the 1990s as part of the European Patent Organization and was revived at the Intergovernmental Conference held in Paris on 24 and 25 June 1999 (see JO L 347 of 31.12.1999 , p. 1). 1999, 545). It ended at the Intergovernmental Conference in London on 17 October 2000 (see JO C 201 of 17.12.2000, p. 1). 2001, 549). The agreement stipulates that States Parties that share an official language of the European Patent Office, i.e. English, French or German, no longer apply for the translation of European patents into one of their official languages.

Other contracting states must choose one of the EPO`s official languages as the “prescribed language” in which European patents must be translated to enter into force in their countries. However, they reserve the right to require the claims to be translated into one of their official languages. The London Agreement, formally called the Agreement on the Application of Article 65 of the Convention on European Patents and sometimes also the London Protocol, is a patent agreement concluded in London on 17 October 2000, which aims to reduce the translation costs of European patents granted under the European Patent Convention (ETC). [1] The London Agreement is an optional agreement between the Member States of the European Patent Organization[1] and has not changed any other language requirements for European patent applications prior to issuance.