Rhodes Armistice Agreement

Rhodes Armistice Agreement

Rhodes Armistice Agreement 150 150 protek

(2) The agreement, negotiated and concluded in accordance with the Security Council resolution of 16 November 1948 calling for a ceasefire to eliminate threats to peace in Palestine and facilitating the transition between that ceasefire and a lasting peace in Palestine, remains in force until a peaceful agreement is reached between the parties. , with the exception of paragraph 3 of this article. The 1949 ceasefire agreements are a series of ceasefire agreements signed in 1949 between Israel and neighbouring Egypt[1] Lebanon[2] Jordan[4] and Syria[4] to officially end the official hostilities of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war and establish ceasefire lines between Iraqi Israeli and Jordanian forces, also known as the Green Line. In March 1949, when Iraqi forces withdrew from Palestine and ceded their positions to the smaller Jordanian delegation, three Israeli brigades depoerated themselves in advantageous positions in Operation Shin-Tav-Shin and Operation Uvda. The operations enabled Israel to renegotiate the ceasefire line in the southern Negev (which allows access to the Red Sea) and the Wadi Ara area in a secret agreement reached on 23 March 1949 and incorporated into the general ceasefire agreement. The green line was then redesigned in blue ink on the south map to give the impression that a move of the green line had been made. [8] The events that led to a change in the Green Line were an exchange of fertile land in the Bethlehem region under Israeli control and the village of Wadi Fukin, which was handed over to Jordanian control. On 15 July, when the Israeli army expelled the population of Wadi Fukin after the transfer of the village to Israeli-occupied territory under the ceasefire agreement between Israel and the Jordanian kingdom, the Joint Ceasefire Commission decided on 31 August, by a majority, that Israel had violated the ceasefire agreement by de-dering villagers on the demarcation line. , and decided that the villagers could go home.

However, on 6 September, when the villagers returned to Wadi Fukin under the authority of UN observers, they found most of their homes destroyed and were again forced by the Israeli army to return to Jordanian-controlled territory. [9] The new military borders for Israel, as defined in the agreements, include about 78% of compulsory Palestine, as established after the independence of Transjordan (now Jordan) in 1946. The populated Arab territories that were not controlled by Israel before 1967 were the West Bank, ruled by Jordan, and the Gaza Strip occupied by Egypt. The most difficult issue that triggered occasional violence was the widespread infiltration of Palestinians (usually in 1948 refugees) beyond the borders of the ceasefire demarcation. These actions provoked Israeli reprisals and called into question the feasibility of Article II of the agreement. Nevertheless, both parties were unwilling to destroy the foundations of their GAA and continued to use their mechanisms to exchange mutual complaints and keep alive the fragile status quo. The no manslands designated by the GAA were divided by agreement; the twice convoy to the Israeli enclave at the Hebrew University on Mount Scopus was authorized to supply Israeli police stationed in Mount Scopus and to regularly replace the police; The reciprocal vulnerability of the citizens of Jerusalem has prompted both sides to keep the city`s dividing lines calm most of the time. The capture of Jerusalem and the West Bank in June 1967 by Israeli troops ended the applicability of the Jordanian-Israeli GAA, as neither the Jordanian civilian government nor the Jordanian army had ever returned to these territories.

The 1994 peace agreement between Jordan and Israel led to the end of the gaA between Jordan and Israel.